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Cuba's Secret Side
Home Page: http://www.CubasSecretSide.com
Channel: KWSU

Wednesday, August 13, 2014
11:00 PM
Under The Radar
Knowing that the Cuban government severely restricts all foreign journalists, Karin Muller took a huge risk - she set out to film a documentary on a simple tourist visa. Free of government minders, she hitchhiked around Cuba for three months - sleeping in private homes, working with farmers and fishermen, and participating in festivals and religious ceremonies. She was arrested over a dozen times, but in the end she discovered a side of Cuba that few foreigners get to see. Like Hector - Havana's pizza guy - who lives on the third floor and uses a basket and pulley system to deliver pizza. Or the wonderful way Cubans have of turning a tedious wait in line into a social event, and the unexpected joy of Havana's waterfront. Cubans joke that the Revolution produced three successes and three failures. The successes were health care, education, and social equality. The failures were breakfast, lunch, and dinner. In the rural sugar town of La Vega, Muller discovered the secret to Cuba's good health. Dr. Angelina walks house to house, visiting every one of La Vega's two thousand inhabitants - even if they're healthy - at least twice a year. Angelina knows everything about her patients, from how many pillows they sleep with to whether they're getting along with their spouses. She is happy with her life and work, despite going home each night to a tiny, dilapidated apartment without running water and having to work two days to earn enough to buy her family a can of spam. Education is another Cuban success - 97% literacy and free universities - but it's not all good news. Books and newspapers are censored, so a nation that has learned to love the written word has no choice but to read the party line. The monthly food distribution provides all Cuban citizens with staples like sugar, rice, and beans. The government also pays retired Cubans a pension, though it's rarely enough to make ends meet. The elderly often augment their meager incomes selling newspapers or collecting cans on the street. When Castro took over Cuba, most



Thursday, August 14, 2014
11:00 PM
The Truth Revealed
The Truth Revealed looks beyond the politics and propaganda at the Cubans themselves. People like Adolpho, a tobacco farmer who had open-heart surgery ten years ago and still tends his fields. Or Marco, who walks for miles each day, his operatic voice enticing villagers to buy his cilantro and hot peppers. Both live in rural villages where time moves more slowly and people look out for each other. Although Castro confiscated all land shortly after the Revolution, the Cuban government has since started allowing farmers to sell their excess harvest, and private food stands have popped up all over Cuba. Castro once tried - unsuccessfully - to eradicate religion in Cuba. Cubans still show their faith every year at the festival of San Lazaro. Many pilgrims crawl six miles to the church. Others drag rocks or suffer even more drastic penances. But Catholicism isn't the only religion in Cuba. Santeria - an African belief brought to Cuba with the slave trade - is practiced by over half the population. Hilda is a Santeria priestess and a devout Catholic. After hosting a huge Christmas dinner, she opens up her home to a secret Santeria celebration, complete with drums and dancing - and a spiritual possession. But as much as Cubans love their faith, they also love to laugh and entertain themselves. You'll find a game of dominoes on almost every street corner and the kids have their own hilariously Cuban version of Monopoly. They play to win and they're just as capitalist as their Yankee counterparts. That's a good thing, since the Cuban government is privatizing over a million jobs in Cuba. Manuel repairs shoes on a Havana street corner, and barely makes ends meet. And yet when his customers don't bother to pick up their shoes, he doesn't sell them - he gives them away. It's capitalism, Cuban style - with a human touch. Cubans are avid fishermen, and on any sunny morning you can find Jose fishing on Havana's waterfront. He owns almost no equipment and only two pairs of shorts, yet cheerfully shares his catch with anyone who